Children's Literature Blogs @ NYPL

  • by Miranda J. McDermott

    Vampirina Ballerina loves dancing, and she does so adorned with a black leotard and black ballet shoes. She also has a black cat and a bat as pets, which are not welcome at ballet class. Plié, relevé... all of the steps that she must learn are daunting, and Vampirina attempts to not trip over her own feet in the process. However, practicing with mummies, vampires and monsters in the Haunted Mansion will definitely improve her skills.

  • by Elizabeth Bird

    Within the span of a single week two of the top Jewish book awards giving credit to great works of Jewish children's literature posted their latest winners. Here are some of the titles they awarded.

  • by Miranda J. McDermott

    Twelve-year-old Summer learns much about the farming process and the wheat crop from working on combine farms with her family. Thunder is a 95-pound Doberman pincher who is her constant companion. He follows her everywhere, and he is always pleasant and willing to pour love into her heart.

  • by Jeanne Lamb

    Librarians are frequently asked to recommend titles for that precocious 9-year-old (or, ___ fill in the blank) who can read well above their grade level.

  • by Miranda J. McDermott

    Sumiko is a 12-year-old Japanese girl living in California in the 1940s. Unfortunately for her, Pearl Harbor has an especially negative impact on her life, due simply to her racial background. The government sends her and her family to a permanent relocation camp in Poston, Arizona; its official nomenclature is the Colorado River Relocation Center. The filth and overcrowded conditions in the camps are deplorable.

  • by Elizabeth Bird

    Every year the American Library Association bestows the Caldecott Medal upon the most distinguished American picture books of the year. So what happens to all those picture books that were written overseas, were translated from other countries, and that remain brilliant but unrewarded?

  • by Miranda J. McDermott

    Children in free public library, Digital ID 416568, New York Public LibraryMarcie Colleen, Picture Book Education Consultant, Amie Wright, Selection Supervisor, MyLibraryNYC, and Daryl Grabarek, editor of School Library Journal's (SLJ) enewsletter, Curriculum Connections joined host Betsy Bird to discuss how teachers, students and parents are grappling with the new standards. I was interested to discover that New York City's new schools chancellor, Carmen Farina, endorses Common Core standards.

  • by Elizabeth Bird

    It's that time of year again! The time when lists of the best books for kids start sprouting up like the crocuses of May. With the big Newbery and Caldecott Awards looming on the horizon, now is a good time to step back and consider those books that may have fallen under the radar but are magnificent just the same.

  • by A. E. Butler

    Harlem branch, fireplace in Children's room, window at right open, children reading, April 8, 1910, Digital ID 94628 , New York Public LibraryLast summer, the tweens of Battery Park City formed a book club. Genres were selected by vote each month, and the books were selected based upon their requests and preferences. Everyone was encouraged to finish the book even if it was not to their taste, which added another dimension to the discussion at our meetings. Each meeting closed with a book talk of the upcoming title and an opportunity for book sharing, which allowed everyone to speak about other books that the group might enjoy.

  • by Miranda J. McDermott

    Everyone loves mahjong, a Chinese tile matching game. When you play mahjong, you can hear the clicking of the tiles.

  • by Jeanne Lamb

    Ruth Guerrier-Pierre keeps the children visiting the Kips Bay Branch of the New York Public Library on their toes. She is an avid reader and loves nothing better than to share books hot-off-the-presses with her readers. Ruth, a life-long New Yorker, started working at NYPL while still an ungraduate at Queens College. She knows all about handling books—she had to shelve plenty while working as a Page in the Central Children's Room at the Donnell Library in 2006.

  • by Miranda J. McDermott

    In the morning in China, everyone chooses different activities. People in the park have their morning fun. One person is resting by the lotus pond. Another one cycles, some people play badminton, and some are stretching. Other people are dancing, some with swords or fans, and others in a waltz. Some people play chess and others play card games.

  • by Miranda J. McDermott

    Getting kids excited about reading is the name of the game. If you are interested in pursuing children's librarianship or you are new in the field, this is the book for you. Slim and easy to read, it provides a few key pieces of advice that will help any new children's librarian. The introduction gives you a taste of the author's background and experience.

  • by Stephanie Whelan

    Where in the world are you reading about? Fiction finds its settings in all corners of the world (and some places only imagined in our minds) but there's something special about fiction set in a familiar city or neighborhood. Let's take a trip out of Manhattan for now, and into the lively borough of Brooklyn! This is one of the most storied areas that make up New York City.

  • by Miranda J. McDermott

    Special Days - Children's Day - Girls playing with dolls, Digital ID 1682217, New York Public LibraryWe were lucky to have authors Yona McDonough, Christy Ottaviano, Krystyna Poray Goddu, Laura Godwin and Ann Martin discuss how dolls have influenced children's literature at the Schwarzman Building on December 7, 2013. The Children's Literary Salons are organized and hosted by Elizabeth Bird, NYPL's Youth Materials Specialist. Thanks to Betsy and the authors for what turned out to be scintillating conversation and synergy on the stage of the South Court Auditorium.

  • by Jeanne Lamb

    Stephanie Whelan has been the Children's Librarian at the Seward Park Library since 2008. The branch is set in the east corner of Seward Park, the first permanent, municipally built playground in the United States.

  • by Miranda J. McDermott

    Reading brings pleasure to people, and we need to nurture kids' reading interests, regardless of whether or not the kids' preferences mirror our own. If reading always seems like a chore, and if kids are constantly drilled on reading what they are not interested in, they will avoid the printed word like the plague.

  • by Jeanne Lamb

    Anna Taylor works at the New York Public Library’s Columbus Library—more than a short walk from Columbus Circle—over on 10th Avenue between 50th and 51st Streets in the Clinton (aka Hell’s Kitchen or Midtown West) neighborhood... an area that has been transformed in recent years by the dramatic increase in residential construction. It is not unusual to find this library filled to the rafters with children and teens catching up on homework, meeting with friends, or just curled up with a good book. As a member of NYPL’s Children’s Books 2013 Committee, Anna had ample opportunity to test out some of this year’s newly published books.

  • by Miranda J. McDermott

    Ready for Christmas with dinosaurs? Then this is the book for you. Tyrannoclaus (a Tyrannosaurus rex) has presents for stegosaur girls. He has tasty treats for carnivores and herbivores, whatever delectable delights that they crave. Tyrannoclaus and helpers wrap up presents for believing dinos, but triceratops babies would not go to bed, while exasperated and angry dino moms and dads plead and beg with their progeny.

  • by Miranda J. McDermott

    This wombat likes eating, sleeping, and getting Christmas stockings. He particularly likes eating carrots. When he finds Christmas reindeer eating his carrots, the wombat gets grumpy. Creatures stealing his carrots is not acceptable behavior.